Body Temperature and Thyroid Problems Print E-mail

 

by Byron Richards

 

 

When your thyroid hormone is working properly inside cells you will make 65% energy and 35% heat as you burn calories for fuel.  Thyroid hormone is governing your basal metabolic rate, orchestrating the idling speed at which all cells make energy and thus heat.  A classic symptom of poor thyroid function is being too cold.  And conversely, a classic symptom of hyperthyroidism is being too hot (making too much heat).  However, many people with slow thyroid are too hot, a seeming paradox that I will explain shortly.

 

Generally, you know all too well if you fit into the too cold category.  You always want the thermostat set higher than everyone else or you have on an extra layer of clothes.  You go to bed with socks on your feet or you want extra layers of blankets.  When this type of coldness matches up with the symptoms of thyroid-related fatigue, you fall into the classic pattern of sluggish or hypothyroid.

 

In many cases of poor thyroid function a cold feeling is not quite so obvious.  Dr. Broda Barnes pioneered the use of the basal temperature test to help identify sluggish thyroid function.  This is done by placing a thermometer (not digital) under your arm for ten minutes before getting out of bed.  This should be done ten days in a row, averaging the daily reading.  Menstruating women should start their ten day test when their menstrual cycle begins, as basal temperature naturally rises 2 degrees at ovulation.  If your waking temperature averages from 97.8 to 98.2 degrees it is normal.  Less than 97.8 reflects sluggish thyroid function.

 

It should be noted that there are other factors besides thyroid that can make a person run too cold.  Common ones include:

 

A) Protein malnutrition that is resulting in a loss of muscle.  Individuals with borderline thyroid should eat at least ½ their ideal weight in grams of protein per day (avoiding excessive intake of soy protein).
B) Nutrients lacking for cellular energy production (co-enzyme B vitamins, Q10, magnesium).
C) Nutrients lacking to implement cellular DNA thyroid instructions (iron or zinc).
D) Excessive stress, which pools blood around central organs and makes hands and feet cold.  Anti-inflammatory nutrients are required to fix this, along with stress management.  Fish oil and squalene are very helpful. 
E) A viral infection, even a subclinical viral infection.  Viruses hijack cellular energy production, shutting down energy and heat production, and making excess lactic acid.  This leaves one feeling cold and achy from the lactic acid.  This is why you get the chills from the flu.  Many viruses, like Epstein-Barr or cytomegalovirus, can operate on a low grade basis – enough to make a person cold, tired, and achy.  Such individuals often wake up with a sore throat in the morning.  Monolaurin is a top choice for nutrient support.

 

 

These coldness issues can masquerade as thyroid problems, and in some cases may in fact be the primary cause of the hypothyroid symptoms.  The proof of the source of the problem is in the solution.  Whatever helps get energy on and temperature up is what is needed.  Sometimes this means thyroid support nutrition.  Sometimes it is addressing any issue in A-E above.  And many times it is some combination of approaches, including thyroid support.

 

Many individuals with hypothyroid symptoms are not cold and may even be hot.  Remember, normal cell energy production is 65% energy and 35% heat.  In classic low thyroid both numbers drop.  However, if thyroid hormone is still signaling cells to go, but cells lack nutrients to properly make energy, then a person may make 50% energy and 50% heat.  If the problem worsens a person could make 35% energy and 65% heat.  Such a problem will present itself as low thyroid, but it is really a deficiency in energy-producing nutrients like co-enzyme B vitamins, Q10, magnesium, and antioxidants.

 

The most common reason for true low thyroid with excess heat occurs in the overweight individual.  In this case the body is trying to dispose of surplus fat calories by converting them to 100% heat.  Even though cells are not making adequate energy or heat, the heat is coming from the desperate attempt of the body to get rid of fat so it doesn’t clog organs, cells, and arteries.  Eating according to the Leptin Diet solves this problem.

 

As thyroid problems deteriorate a person becomes both heat and cold intolerant.  Hot humid days are stressful; frigid winter days are stressful.  The body’s heat regulating system simply struggles to keep up with environmental demands, especially when they are more extreme.  Aging is generally associated with deteriorating thyroid function and troubles regulating body temperature.

 

Understanding your body’s heating and cooling system is central to effectively managing thyroid health.

 

 

About the author:
Byron J. Richards, Founder/Director of Wellness Resources (
www.wellnessresources.com), is a Board-Certified Clinical Nutritionist and nationally-renowned health expert, radio personality, and educator. He is the author of Mastering Leptin, The Leptin Diet, and Fight for Your Health: Exposing the FDA's Betrayal of America.

 

 

 

 

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  • Guest - Barbie

    Hello..

    I have a Horrible problem...heat up unbearably then sweat from the Neck & head area mostly & right after I become totally Frozen to the point of it being almost paniful..Esp in the hands & feet..Dr. can't seem to find the trouble..says all Blood Work tests are Normal & standard Thyroid tests keep coming back Normal...I'm just about read to pack it in..Truly..at 6l yrs of age my life has turned to total misery.

    Like 0 Short URL:
  • Guest - carolyn sumner

    hello barbie

    did u ever ask for anti bodies test ..please ask ....

    Like 0 Short URL:
  • Guest - suke

    undiagnosed thyroid problems can often lead to quite dramatic complications so it is vital that the various symptoms are recognised and, more importantly, acted upon.If it continues to be undiagnosed, and therefore untreated, an underactive thyroid, hypothyroidism can significantly increase a person's chances of suffering from heart disease or depression. In addition, obesity is far more common and difficult to counter. In hypothyroidism, the thyroid has become underactive and consequently the rate of the body's metabolism has slowed down the slower the metabolism becomes, the more pronounced the symptoms.
    http://www.disease-symptoms.com

    Like 0 Short URL:
  • Guest - Cath

    Hi Barbie, I am new to this site, but on reading your posting had to write. I have exactly the same problem with overheating and excessive drenching from head area, only I don't cool down quickly. My doc also says my thyroid levels are okay according to blood test results. I am miserable with it, and find it most embarrassing to have my hair soaking wet and dripping, even without exersion. My body thermostat seems to be in overdrive. I am 62, and last time I was this bad my thyroid levels were slightly up and I voluntarily (with GPs knowledge, dropped 25mg of thyroxine and symptoms went. This time thyroxine levels are in normal range, so flumuxed, and fed up. Did you ever get your situation resolved?

    Like 0 Short URL:
  • Guest - Shirley Jones

    I began taking thyroxine after Thyroidectomy operation. Am currently taking 100mg and am experience the same problems with extreme heat and then cold sypmtoms. Also shaking, lethergy and unable to sleep.,I have been having reguliar function tests and all seem to come back normal. My doctor doesn't seem to have any explanation and this has really been effecting my life as I am constantly exhausted.

    Any advise would be appreciated.

    Like 0 Short URL:
  • Guest - Deb

    Shirley, please read Dr Peatfield's book, your thyroid and how to keep it healthy. I was taking thyroxine for 18 years and getting worse and worse. Sometimes your body loses the ability to convert T4 ( in thyroxine) to T3 needed by your body. I now take T3 and feel much better thyroid wise ( I have other issues which don't help)
    The problem with this is that your GP wont be happy about T3, so read the book first before you start that battle!! Others on this site also on T3.

    Like 0 Short URL:
  • Guest - keshia

    my roommate has underactive thyroid disease and she is hot all the time. She wants to turn the air on at night which affects me and my other roommates sleeping because we get really cold. She says scientifically I would sleep better when it's cold but I don't. Is it true that scientifically I will sleep better when it's unbearably cold in the room or is she just lying so she can have her way with the air on? Also if she was creating more body heat because of thyroid would she be bundled up in a blanket if she complains how hot she is? I'm just really sick and tired hearing about thyroid this and that....she acts like thyroid disease is having cancer and she is no where near that

    Like 0 Short URL:
  • Guest - lk10

    firstly keshia, you're right - don't think any of us who suffer with thyroid problems would consider it anywhere near as serious as cancer. Sorry to hear your flat mate's making your life so miserable, it must be terrible for you! Try walking a day in our shoes though when there is nothing you can do to cool down no matter what the weather. No it's not life threatening but believe me this condition makes your life a misery. Best thing i would suggest for your flat mate is to get herself a more considerate and less selfish flat mate!

    Like 0 Short URL:
  • Guest - keshia

    I'm sorry lk10 but try walking a day in my shoes too! I have health problems up the yin yang and I constantly give her options and I get that she is unbearably hot but I'm not thinking about myself but my other roommates in the next room too. we share one air conditioner. When it's 40 degrees outside we have the window open and the air on it kinda gets ridiculously cold. I asked her if we could get a fan or some other options that wouldn't affect my roommates but she refuses to try them. And I'm guessing in the case of being hot you would do anything to try and cool down. So don't call me selfish because I want to understand her and her thyroid but once she starts putting everyone else's health in danger that's where I draw the line! I'm not going to be running around sick all the time because of a weak immune system trying to sleep in a 45 degree room at night!

    Like 0 Short URL:
  • Guest - Lee

    I had depression and anxiety. Could not stand the heat and sunlight. Could not sleep. I was sweating off and on. Went to neurologist and had MRI and blood tests. Found nothing. Desperate went to another DR. Said I had Parkinsons but not all symptoms led to Parkinsons. Sent to psych for depression and anxiety. Given anidepressants and mood pills. Given xray for lung in hospital and by accident found nodules on my thyroid. Had surgery on thyroid. Part of thyroid is still left. I lost my psych doctor before all this and I am still on antidepressants. I have no anxiety. Appointment with family doctor to discuss this matter this week. Could my trouble have been the thyroid? Possibly should I be taking medicine after surgery for thyroid? Thanks

    Like 0 Short URL:
Comments (13)Add Comment
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written by ¬¬, September 17, 2008
y do we need a fix core body temperture?
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written by Symptoms of Thyroid, July 31, 2009
Adult early symptoms include easy fatigue, exhaustion, Poor tolerance to cold temperatures, Constipation and Carpal tunnel syndrome (pain at the wrists and numbness of the hands) while the late signs include Poor appetite, weight gain, dry skin, hair loss, intellectual ability worsens Deeper, hoarse voice, puffiness around the eyes, irregular menstrual periods or lack of menstrual periods..symptoms which was very important to know, knowing that thyroid problems is not just a simple problems to ignore… for more information regarding thyroid problems, visit www.symptomsofthyroid.info and check it yourself….
0
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written by Thyroid Level, July 31, 2009
undiagnosed thyroid problems can often lead to quite dramatic complications so it is vital that the various symptoms are recognised and, more importantly, acted upon.If it continues to be undiagnosed, and therefore untreated, an underactive thyroid, hypothyroidism can significantly increase a person's chances of suffering from heart disease or depression. In addition, obesity is far more common and difficult to counter. In hypothyroidism, the thyroid has become underactive and consequently the rate of the body's metabolism has slowed down the slower the metabolism becomes, the more pronounced the symptoms.
0
...
written by Barbie, March 04, 2010
Hello..

I have a Horrible problem...heat up unbearably then sweat from the Neck & head area mostly & right after I become totally Frozen to the point of it being almost paniful..Esp in the hands & feet..Dr. can't seem to find the trouble..says all Blood Work tests are Normal & standard Thyroid tests keep coming back Normal...I'm just about read to pack it in..Truly..at 6l yrs of age my life has turned to total misery.
0
...
written by carolyn sumner, June 11, 2010
hello barbie

did u ever ask for anti bodies test ..please ask ....
0
...
written by suke, June 22, 2010
undiagnosed thyroid problems can often lead to quite dramatic complications so it is vital that the various symptoms are recognised and, more importantly, acted upon.If it continues to be undiagnosed, and therefore untreated, an underactive thyroid, hypothyroidism can significantly increase a person's chances of suffering from heart disease or depression. In addition, obesity is far more common and difficult to counter. In hypothyroidism, the thyroid has become underactive and consequently the rate of the body's metabolism has slowed down the slower the metabolism becomes, the more pronounced the symptoms.
http://www.disease-symptoms.com
0
...
written by Cath, July 20, 2010
Hi Barbie, I am new to this site, but on reading your posting had to write. I have exactly the same problem with overheating and excessive drenching from head area, only I don't cool down quickly. My doc also says my thyroid levels are okay according to blood test results. I am miserable with it, and find it most embarrassing to have my hair soaking wet and dripping, even without exersion. My body thermostat seems to be in overdrive. I am 62, and last time I was this bad my thyroid levels were slightly up and I voluntarily (with GPs knowledge, dropped 25mg of thyroxine and symptoms went. This time thyroxine levels are in normal range, so flumuxed, and fed up. Did you ever get your situation resolved?
0
...
written by Shirley Jones, September 03, 2011
I began taking thyroxine after Thyroidectomy operation. Am currently taking 100mg and am experience the same problems with extreme heat and then cold sypmtoms. Also shaking, lethergy and unable to sleep.,I have been having reguliar function tests and all seem to come back normal. My doctor doesn't seem to have any explanation and this has really been effecting my life as I am constantly exhausted.

Any advise would be appreciated.
0
...
written by Deb, September 04, 2011
Shirley, please read Dr Peatfield's book, your thyroid and how to keep it healthy. I was taking thyroxine for 18 years and getting worse and worse. Sometimes your body loses the ability to convert T4 ( in thyroxine) to T3 needed by your body. I now take T3 and feel much better thyroid wise ( I have other issues which don't help)
The problem with this is that your GP wont be happy about T3, so read the book first before you start that battle!! Others on this site also on T3.
0
...
written by keshia, October 18, 2011
my roommate has underactive thyroid disease and she is hot all the time. She wants to turn the air on at night which affects me and my other roommates sleeping because we get really cold. She says scientifically I would sleep better when it's cold but I don't. Is it true that scientifically I will sleep better when it's unbearably cold in the room or is she just lying so she can have her way with the air on? Also if she was creating more body heat because of thyroid would she be bundled up in a blanket if she complains how hot she is? I'm just really sick and tired hearing about thyroid this and that....she acts like thyroid disease is having cancer and she is no where near that
0
...
written by lk10, October 18, 2011
firstly keshia, you're right - don't think any of us who suffer with thyroid problems would consider it anywhere near as serious as cancer. Sorry to hear your flat mate's making your life so miserable, it must be terrible for you! Try walking a day in our shoes though when there is nothing you can do to cool down no matter what the weather. No it's not life threatening but believe me this condition makes your life a misery. Best thing i would suggest for your flat mate is to get herself a more considerate and less selfish flat mate!
0
...
written by keshia, October 19, 2011
I'm sorry lk10 but try walking a day in my shoes too! I have health problems up the yin yang and I constantly give her options and I get that she is unbearably hot but I'm not thinking about myself but my other roommates in the next room too. we share one air conditioner. When it's 40 degrees outside we have the window open and the air on it kinda gets ridiculously cold. I asked her if we could get a fan or some other options that wouldn't affect my roommates but she refuses to try them. And I'm guessing in the case of being hot you would do anything to try and cool down. So don't call me selfish because I want to understand her and her thyroid but once she starts putting everyone else's health in danger that's where I draw the line! I'm not going to be running around sick all the time because of a weak immune system trying to sleep in a 45 degree room at night!
0
...
written by Lee, May 02, 2012
I had depression and anxiety. Could not stand the heat and sunlight. Could not sleep. I was sweating off and on. Went to neurologist and had MRI and blood tests. Found nothing. Desperate went to another DR. Said I had Parkinsons but not all symptoms led to Parkinsons. Sent to psych for depression and anxiety. Given anidepressants and mood pills. Given xray for lung in hospital and by accident found nodules on my thyroid. Had surgery on thyroid. Part of thyroid is still left. I lost my psych doctor before all this and I am still on antidepressants. I have no anxiety. Appointment with family doctor to discuss this matter this week. Could my trouble have been the thyroid? Possibly should I be taking medicine after surgery for thyroid? Thanks

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Last Updated on Sunday, 23 January 2011 13:40
 

 

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