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The Difference Between Chemical Allergy and Chemical Toxicity





MCS America

Lourdes Salvador's Column

...Co-founder of MCS America discusses the latest Multiple Chemical Sensitivity issues.









Lourdes Salvador volunteers as a writer and social advocate for the recognition of multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS). She was a passionate advocate for the homeless and worked with her local governor to provide services to the homeless through a new approach she created to end homelessness. That passion soon turned to advocacy and activism for people with MCS and the medical professionals who serve them. She co-founded MCS Awareness in 2005 and went on to found MCS America in 2006. She serves as a partner for Environmental Education Week, a partner for the Collaborative on Health and the Environment (CHE), and a supporter for the American Cancer Society: Campaign for Smokefree Air.


For more information visit MCS America




Monday, February 9th, 2009:


Q&A: The Difference Between Chemical Allergy and Chemical Toxicity


by Lourdes Salvador



Q: What is the difference between a chemical allergy and a chemical toxicity?


A: An allergy produces hay fever like symptoms such as sneezing, runny nose, itching, nasal stuffiness, watering eyes, wheezing, and coughing. Allergy symptoms are generally regarded as different degrees of a nuisance. The symptoms are usually easily observable by a physician and therefore and easily accepted and diagnosed. Diagnosis can be confirmed with typical allergy tests for elevated immunoglobulin E (IgE).


The symptoms of chemical toxicity are typically neurological and include headache, extreme fatigue, dizziness, weakness nausea, disorientation, memory problems, slowed reaction time, peripheral neuropathy, sensory neuropathy, and personality/mood changes. Other symptoms may include respiratory difficulty, rash, burning sensations in the nose and mouth, and gastrointestinal disorders. Serious toxicity may result in impaired speech, seizures, stroke, and paralysis.


Chemical toxicity is not regarded as a nuisance, but rather a major life-altering crisis. Victims of toxicity will take extreme measures to avoid further exposure to substances which add to their toxic load and produce a multitude of symptoms as a result of toxicity induced cellular inflammation, nutritional deficiencies, malabsorption, and impaired detoxification.


The symptoms of toxicity are not easily observable by a physician and often seem vague and subjective as reported by the patient. The extreme measures taken to avoid further exposure often seem out of proportion to the person’s otherwise normal appearance and may lead to an incorrect conclusion that the person is psychotic, paranoid, or anxious.


Diagnosis is initially difficult unless the patient was poisoned on the job or has had a sudden acute exposure to a known toxic substance. Patients suffering from chronic low-level exposure to a toxic substance may not even be aware of the substance that has made them ill. Instead they may report illness when in a certain building or exposed to certain chemicals.


Typically chronic low-level poisoning cases include chronic environmental pesticide, mold, or formaldehyde exposure in the home or workplace.


Typical allergy treatments such as antihistamines and provocative neutralization don’t reduce the symptoms of toxicity. In fact, since the body is already toxic, antihistamines and other drugs often add to body burden and make the symptoms worse.


Through identifying and ceasing the source of exposure and treating the physical damage caused by the toxicant, symptoms from toxicity can be reduced and/or eliminated. A physician specializing in this area is recommended.




For more articles on this topic, see: MCSA News.


Copyrighted 2008 Lourdes Salvador & MCS America



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  • Hi Sonia,

    Many of the chemicals used in the manufacture and finishing of cabinets, whether for the use in buildings or aircraft, are what are known as "endocrine disrupters" - they mess with the functioning of your hormones. So, your work could certainly be connected to your menstrual problems. I'm afraid I don't know what the bluish discharge could be.

    I'd advise you to visit the [URL=]Aerotoxic Association[/URL] website and perhaps email them with a query about this.

    I hope you find an answer, it must be very distressing indeed.

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