I.B.S. Relief Maff Hot

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Written by Maff     July 23, 2007    
 
7.0
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A Doctor, a Dietitian, and a Psychologist Provide a Team Approach to Managing Irritable Bowel Syndrome

 

by Dawn Burstall, T. Michael Vallis, Geoffrey K. Turnbull

 

Finally, A Complete Approach To Managing I.B.S. At last, here’s a comprehensive program that combines every proven strategy to managing irritable bowel syndrome. Written by a team of specialists, I.B.S. Relief succeeds where single-dimensional treatment attempts fall short because it addresses the complex nature of I.B.S. There are medical issues that require a gastroenterologist, nutrition issues that require a registered dietitian, and stress and coping issues that require a psychologist. Going beyond generalities, this book will help you pinpoint and treat your unique pattern of symptoms, including pain, bloating, constipation, diarrhea, even heartburn. You’ll learn how to:

 

* Limit the frequency and intensity of episodes
*Adjust your diet to your symptoms
*Manage pain
*Establish a healthy routine
*Deal with stress
*Practice relaxation strategies
*Overcome fatigue

 

I.B.S. Relief also offers self-assessments, helpful record forms, and six different diet plans to be used alone or in combination.

 

Buy from Amazon.com

 

 

 

Editor reviews

This book is written by a gastroenterologist, a nutritionist, and a psychologist. As such it is marketed as a guide to coping with irritable bowel syndrome by 3 experts in fields associated with the condition.

I think the most accurate description of this book is that it is a comprehensive, well written, and readable guide on the orthodox views of IBS. It covers diagnosis, research findings, and how diet and stress trigger symptoms and affect their severity. As far as it goes, the advice will likely be useful to a lot of IBS sufferers.

The obvious downside to this book is that it looks at the condition purely from an orthodox medical perspective and seems comfortable with the limitations that this narrow view brings. There are many effective solutions for IBS in the field of alternative/complementary medicine from the use of probiotics to the use of IgG food sensitivity testing and appropriate elimination diet. These approaches are also backed by research it should be noted and by a considerable number of patient reports. On a personal note, I have found these methods much more effective than the limited advice I received from a gastroenterologist and a dietician after being diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome myself.

The suggestion by the nutritionist in this book that IBS sufferers should load up with insoluble fibre from wheat is sure to confuse many patients and health professionals alike. It is widely known that celiac disease (gluten/wheat allergy) is underdiagnosed and many patients diagnosed with IBS may in fact have this condition. Suggesting patients consume large amounts of gluten containing wheat and other grains is risky at best in this situation in my opinion. Gluten and wheat are known to be irritating to the gut lining even if celiac disease is not present.

In summary I would find it hard to recommend this as the only book an IBS patient should read on the subject. As part of a larger library of IBS titles it may be worth having however as it does present orthodox medical views well. Personally I would suggest readers try a more rounded book first or perhaps buy a book about the alternative/complementary medicine approach to IBS along with this title.



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Maff Reviewed by Maff July 23, 2007
Last updated: July 30, 2009
#1 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (107)

Comprehensive guide to orthodox treatment of IBS

This book is written by a gastroenterologist, a nutritionist, and a psychologist. As such it is marketed as a guide to coping with irritable bowel syndrome by 3 experts in fields associated with the condition.

I think the most accurate description of this book is that it is a comprehensive, well written, and readable guide on the orthodox views of IBS. It covers diagnosis, research findings, and how diet and stress trigger symptoms and affect their severity. As far as it goes, the advice will likely be useful to a lot of IBS sufferers.

The obvious downside to this book is that it looks at the condition purely from an orthodox medical perspective and seems comfortable with the limitations that this narrow view brings. There are many effective solutions for IBS in the field of alternative/complementary medicine from the use of probiotics to the use of IgG food sensitivity testing and appropriate elimination diet. These approaches are also backed by research it should be noted and by a considerable number of patient reports. On a personal note, I have found these methods much more effective than the limited advice I received from a gastroenterologist and a dietician after being diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome myself.

The suggestion by the nutritionist in this book that IBS sufferers should load up with insoluble fibre from wheat is sure to confuse many patients and health professionals alike. It is widely known that celiac disease (gluten/wheat allergy) is underdiagnosed and many patients diagnosed with IBS may in fact have this condition. Suggesting patients consume large amounts of gluten containing wheat and other grains is risky at best in this situation in my opinion. Gluten and wheat are known to be irritating to the gut lining even if celiac disease is not present.

In summary I would find it hard to recommend this as the only book an IBS patient should read on the subject. As part of a larger library of IBS titles it may be worth having however as it does present orthodox medical views well. Personally I would suggest readers try a more rounded book first or perhaps buy a book about the alternative/complementary medicine approach to IBS along with this title.



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