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TOPIC: ASI results

ASI results 9 years 8 months ago #1

  • konnor
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Well my ASI results are in, and make for interesting reading.

The first test was the standard ASI...



This looks fairly in line with how I feel. My most tired points in the day are in the morning and after work around 6ish, although a sample wasn't taken at this time. I also 'wake' up after about 8ish and struggle to get to sleep by 10-11, again showing parallels with the results, although technically it is in range.

Based on the CFS.org stages, this probably puts me as an early stage 4

The accompanying figures and commentary....



DHEA



Insulin



Progesterone



SIgA



Not sure theres much of significance there, except for elavated DHEA and surpressed SIgA. The DHEA baffles me a little and I might need some help interpreting what the SIgA might mean.

All in all, hard to say whether these results are severe enough to cause the wide range of symptoms I have. I took the same test with a different company over a year ago and got a similar ASI curve, which could mean I've merely sustained my level with my lifestyle changes or that it's secondary to another issue which remains to pull down the adrenals.

Worth doing in any case and I would welcome any pointers.

Ta,
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Re:ASI results 9 years 8 months ago #2

  • Maff
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Hi Matt,

That's really interesting. Your cortisol curve is almost identical to mine - depressed in the morning and elevated at night indicating a disruption in circadian rhythm. My curve is slightly more eratic shooting up at midday day before dropping significantly at 4pm before going back up to the same level as yours by midnight.

See this blog entry for comparison: My Adrenal Stress Index (ASI) Test Results
I too struggle badly in the morning and then find it hard to get to sleep.

It is unusual to have such a cortisol curve but high DHEA. Traditionally DHEA is thought to decrease first in cases of adrenal fatigue. However I think there is more going on here.

The insulin values could certainly be a result of your cortisol production. High night cortisol would certainly interfere with insulin production and sensitivity as the two hormones have antagnostic functions at the cells - insulin trying to transport nutrients into the cells for fuel and storage and cortisol trying to break down tissues and use the glucose, fatty acids and amino acids as fuel in times of stress.

I feel your low sIgA levels may be a key point here that you should look into further. With low sIgA your GI tract becomes much more susceptible to infection and conditions such as small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), yeast overgrowth (e.g. Candida) and a host of other disturbances in the gut microflora. These can all lead to increased intestinal permability (leaky gut syndrome), food allergies/sensitivities, liver toxicity, autoimmune disease and general systemic inflammation. All of these would put extra strain on your adrenals, creating a viscious cycle.

Personally I'd advise an intestinal permeability test and a comprehensive digestive stool analysis (CDSA) to see what's going on in your gut. Have you had a glucose tolerance test or been tested for glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c)? These would shed further light on your insulin sensitivity/hypoglycaemia.<br /><br />Post edited by: Maff, at: 2009/12/18 14:03
If you are going through hell, keep going - Winston Churchill
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Re:ASI results 9 years 8 months ago #3

  • konnor
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Thanks chap.

I thought it was interesting. The curve is very similar to the result I took last August about a year and a few months ago. Perhaps good in the sense that from an adrenal perspective I've not really declined over that period, hinting that diet, lifestyle and supplements have 'stopped the rot'.

Suggests to me another chronic stressor of some sort is at work.

Certain key things point to this.
- history of antibiotic use.
- Some symptoms that would be classed as rare even if adrenal fatigue is an issue - like liver ache and post nasal drip.

However....
- I don't have any external signs of Candida
- My first symptoms were hypoglycemia and post nasal drip. Only later on did food allergies and digestive problems become an issue.

Anywho I can still only speculate. Will look at the Intestinal Permeability test when I need have some funds. A CDSA could be a long way off!

Started to irrigate my nose with salt and oregano oil. This long standing symptom may be playing more of a part than I thought. Also might try some quercetin and bromelain.

I've not had a GTT or a HbA1c. Felt like I blew my chance with the GTT when i cancelled the appointment. To get it re-arranged I would need to be refered back to the endo from my G.P, and try to explain why I cancelled it. Not being sympathetic to EI I might struggle.

Hey ho. Christmas soon!
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Re:ASI results 9 years 7 months ago #4

  • Maff
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Hi mate,

With your history of antibiotic use and liver ache I would certainly be inclined to push for you to investigate the possibility of gut dysbiosis and leaky gut syndrome.

So please look into the the intestinal permeability test and also the Gut Fermentation Profile from Biolab if you can. Neither are hugely expensive (like the CDSA is) and are probably more useful when done in combination!

Candida could contribute significantly to your hypoglycaemia both through causing liver toxicity and adrenal fatigue but also through the direct effects of the ethanol it produces. Ethanol/alcohol metabolism is a high priority in the body. The cells are actually forced to shut down energy production through the Kreb's cycle and divert their resources to detoxifying alcohol. There is a cascade of biochemical events that occur which ultimately lead to the production of hypoglycaemia as a direct result of alcohol metabolism. I can't remember the steps right now (it's been a long, busy day and I've got a major mental block!) but Google \"alcohol hypoglycaemia\" and you should find an explanation easy enough if you're interested ;)
If you are going through hell, keep going - Winston Churchill
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