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TOPIC: Triphala for candida and leaky gut

Triphala for candida and leaky gut 5 years 1 week ago #1

  • Dechen
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Have been taking this lately for severe intestinal inflammation, leaky gut and candida. It causes die-off!

Here's what they say:

The most popular herbal remedies in the health food industry are those that promote bowel movement. The reason is quite simple since a very common problem for so many individuals is constipation and bowel irregularity. Consider how tremendously valuable a formula is that not only regulates bowel movement but at the same time does the following:

* Improves digestion,
* Reduces serum cholesterol,
* Improves circulation (potentiates adrenergic function),
* Contains 31% linoleic acid,
* Exerts a marked cardio-protective effect,
* Reduces high blood pressure,
* Improves liver function,
* Has proven anti-inflammatory and anti-viral properties,
* Expectorant, hypotensive.

Sound like a panacea? Well, it is practically just that.

Triphala, as it is called, is the most popular Ayurvedic herbal formula of India, since it is an effective laxative that also supports the body's strength. The constitution of vegetarian Hindus cannot tolerate harsh laxatives anymore than vegetarians in other countries. Because of its high nutritional value, Triphala uniquely cleanses and detoxifies at the deepest organic levels without depleting the body's reserves. This makes it one of the most valuable herbal preparations in the world.

How is Triphala different from other kinds of laxatives? There are two primary types of herbal laxatives. One is called a purgative and includes herbs such as senna, rhubarb, leptandra, buckthorne and cascara. These often contain bitter principles in the form of anthroquinones that work by stimulating the peristaltic action of the intestinal lining, either directly or by promoting the secretion of bile through the liver and gall bladder.

The second type of laxative is a lubricating bulk laxative, including demulcent herbs such as psyllium and flax seed. This is more nutritional and usually does not have any significant direct effect on either the liver or the gall bladder. Instead, these work like a sponge by swelling and absorbing fluid, thus acting as an intestinal broom.

Triphala combines both nutritional as well as blood and liver cleansing actions. It has little function as a demulcent or lubricating laxative, however. It possesses some anthroquinones that help to stimulate bile flow and peristalsis. The nutritional aspect is in the form of its high vitamin C content, and the presence of linoleic oil and other important nutrients that make it more of a tonic.

People who are in need of purgatives are those whose bowel irregularity is caused by liver and gall bladder congestion, usually accompanied, to some degree, by blood toxins. Those in need of demulcent laxatives are those with intestinal dryness caused by a variety of metabolic factors including a nutritional deficiency as well as a condition of excess hypermetabolic energy. Triphala will prove useful for all kinds of constipation except that caused by a lack of vital energy or chi. Even for the latter type, it will not further deplete such an individual and can be made to work well if it is combined with other chi, blood or yang-warming tonic herbs such as ginseng for chi tonification, tang kuei for blood tonification and prepared aconite for yang tonification.

Herbal healing is largely a matter of strategy. One approach may emphasize tonification while another emphasizes elimination. The problem with overemphasizing tonification is that it can lead to further stagnation and congestion in an excess condition. Emphasizing elimination through the overuse of purgatives in an already deficient individual can further deplete the body's store of minerals and essential B vitamins and can also cause an imbalance of beneficial intestinal microorganisms. The result is weakness with a likely tendency towards chronic fatigue and anemia. Since the body is always simultaneously involved with maintaining and gaining strength through good nutrition as well as eliminating waste, Triphala is unique in that it is naturally able to support both vital processes simultaneously.

Because of its high nutritional content, Ayurvedic doctors generally do not regard Triphala as a mere laxative. Some of the scientific research and practical experience of people who have used it down through the ages has demonstrated that Triphala is an effective blood purifier that stimulates bile secretion as it detoxifies the liver, helps digestion and assimilation, and significantly reduces serum cholesterol and lipid levels throughout the body. As a result, it is regarded as a kind of universal panacea and is the most commonly prescribed herbal formula.

A popular folk saying in India is: \"No mother? Do not worry so long as you have Triphala.\" The reason is that Indian people believe that Triphala is able to care for the internal organs of the body as a mother cares for her children. Each of the three herbal fruits of Triphala takes care of the body by gently promoting internal cleansing of all conditions of stagnation and excess while at the same time it improves digestion and assimilation.

We herbalists believe that the longevity and innate power of herbs such as those of Triphala are, when ingested, energetically absorbed and imparted to our reserves. This belief exists with herbs such as wild ginseng, where specimens that have \"weathered\" decades of climatic stress have been found to contain the highest concentration of ginsenosides. The Ginkgo tree is another of those long lived plants whose evolution extends back over millennia to the time of the dinosaurs.

The three fruits of Triphala (Harada, Amla and Bihara) each correspond to the \"three humours\" or \"tridosha\" of Indian Ayurvedic medicine. According to Ayurvedic theory, the body is composed of three doshas or humours. Vata is sometimes translated as \"wind\" which corresponds to the mind and nervous system. Its nature is dry, cold, light and activating. The second is pitta which is also translated as \"fire\" or \"bile.\" It is responsible for all metabolic transformations including the digestion and assimilation of food as well as assimilation and clarity of thought and understanding. The nature of pitta is primarily hot, moist and light. Kapha is sometimes translated as the \"water\" or \"mucus\" humour and is responsible for all anabolic or building functions such as the development of muscle and bone tissue. Its nature is cool, moist and heavy.

Harada, having a bitter flavor, is associated with the vata humour and with elemenst of well air and space. It treats imbalances and diseases of the vata humour. Harada possesses laxative, astringent, lubricant, antiparasitical, alterative, antispasmodic and nervine properties. It is therefore used to treat acute and chronic constipation, nervousness, anxiety and feelings of physical heaviness.

Among Tibetans, Harada is so highly revered for its purifying attributes that it is the small fruit that is depicted in the hands of the \"medicine Buddha\" in their sacred paintings or tankas. Of the three fruits, Harada is the most laxative and contains anthroquinones similar to those found in rhubarb and cascara.

Amla has a sour flavor and corresponds to the pitta humour and the fire element in Ayurvedic medicine. It is a cooling tonic, astringent, mildly laxative, alterative, antipyretic. It is used to treat fire imbalances that include ulcers, inflammation of the stomach nd intestines, constipation, diarrhea, liver congestion, eruptions, infections and burning feelings throughout the body. In various studies, Amla has been shown to have mild anti-bacterial properties, as well as pronounced expectorant, anti-viral and cardiotonic activity.

Amla is the highest natural known source of vitamin C, having 20 times the vitamin C content of an orange. The vitamin C in Amla is also uniquely heat stable. Even when subjected to prolonged high heat, as in the making of the Ayurvedic tonic formula called Chyavanprash (Amla, as the primary herb comprises 50% of the formula), it loses hardly any of the vitamin C that was present when it was freshly harvested off the tree. The same is true of Amla that has been dried and kept for up to a year. This age and heat stable form of vitamin C that Amla possesses is due to the presence of certain tannins that bind and inhibit its dissipation.

Bihara is astringent, tonic, digestive and anti-spasmodic. Its primary flavor is astringent and the secondary is sweet, bitter and pungent. It targets imbalances associated with the kapha or mucus humour, corresponding to the earth and water elements in Ayurvedic medicine. Specifically Bihara purifies and balances excess mucus, treats asthma, bronchiole conditions, allergies and hiccoughs.

Ama is a term denoting a substance associated in Ayurveda with chronic disease patterns and symptoms of aging. It is described as a kind of sticky buildup of material that clogs the circulatory channels. In many ways it is nearly identical to the accumulation of excess cholesterol and blood lipids described in the West. Both conditions seem to contribute to a wide variety of circulatory disorders ranging from senility to rheumatic conditions, cancer and heart disease. It is interesting that in Traditional Chinese Medicine there is also a pathological condition associated with the heart called \"invisible mucus\" that is similar to the descriptions of both excess cholesterol in the West, and ama in Ayurveda.

One of the body's reactions to coping with stress is to increase the production of corticosteroids. The accumulation of these stress hormones can also contribute to the formation of cholesterol. Internal stress and the resultant buildup of cholesterol can be caused by the abuse of stimulants, spicy, hot foods such as garlic and cayenne, excessive aerobic exercise and repression of the emotions. It is interesting that some of the very substances and activities that can lower cholesterol in some, when not utilized in a holistic, balanced manner, can act as a stimulant and add further stress that would precipitate the further accumulation of cholesterol. Triphala is one of two Ayurvedic formulations that are specific for eliminating Ama and cholesterol from the body.
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Re:Triphala for candida and leaky gut 5 years 5 days ago #2

  • Dechen
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Actually posting a little update-

I have severe inflammation in the gut, massive candida and nausea most the time.

Well this triphala that I've been taking for a few days causes die-off, relieves nausea (and it does cleanse the liver seemingly), expels mucus and it does soothe my gut a bit.

So I'm ordering more. Maybe some of you would like to experiment.

Because that's how we find solutions, here, innit? Experimenting. No other way,
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More on Triphala 5 years 3 days ago #3

  • Dechen
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Even though am a total mess, triphala rocks.


Triphala and Benefits of Triphala Herb
Dr. John Anne
June 01, 2007
General Description

Triphala literally means ‘three fruits’ (tri = three, phala = fruits). It is a mixture composed of the three essential myrobalans. They are:-

(i) Amalaki (Emblica officinalis)

(ii) Bibhitaki (Terminalia belerica)

(iii) Haritaki (Terminalia chebula)

Properties

The properties of the Triphala are dependent on the properties of its individual herbs. Let us see what these properties are:-

(i) Amalaki, i.e. the Indian gooseberry, is the richest source of vitamin C in the world. It is a light green fruit with a sour taste due to its acidic content. The fruit is cooling and refreshing. It also has laxative and purgative properties. Since it has good amount of vitamin C, amalaki hastens blood clotting and heals wounds. In some cases, amalaki has been used to renew lost sexual vigor in men and women with success.

(ii) Bibhitaki is a bitter herb, also popularly known as behra. Like amalaki, it also has beneficial effects in healing of wounds. It is a tonic and a laxative. It can reduce fevers, and hence it is an antipyretic.

(iii) Haritaki is one of the mildest and safest laxatives used in Ayurvedic medicine. It prevents blood clotting. Haritaki is a stomachic; it improves the functioning of the stomach and facilitates digestion. Haritaki is used to improve all nutritional imbalances in the system, and looks after the entire digestive, absorptive, assimilative and excretory process.

Hence, Triphala which is made up of these three valuable components is a real boon to Ayurveda. Recently, the potential of Triphala in stopping the growth of cancerous cells in the body is being studied in greater detail.

The following are the general properties of Triphala:-

(i) Triphala has anti-inflammatory properties.

(ii) Triphala regulates the functioning of the cardiovascular system and the liver.

(iii) Triphala has excellent effect on the digestive system. It has laxative properties.

(iv) Triphala can reduce the cholesterol that is accumulated in the blood.

(v) Triphala is an expectorant.

(vi) Triphala fastens the healing process, because it has collagen, an important cementing material required in the process of blood clotting.

Triphala Uses

Triphala is vastly considered as one of the most important medicines Ayurveda has ever provided to the world. The following are the uses for which Triphala is today internationally acclaimed:-

(i) Digestive Problems

All the three constituents of the Triphala have laxative properties. Triphala can stimulate the mucosal lining of the gastric and the intestinal tract, and hence help in digestion. Triphala is prescribed to people having constipation problems. By regular use of Triphala for a few days, the toxins within the intestinal tract are flushed out. Triphala is also prescribed for tonifying (i.e. regulating) the functioning of the stomach and the colon. Triphala is prescribed as an essential medicine for the elderly who are prone to have more digestive problems than the younger people. This is mainly because Triphala is a non-habit forming drug, and it has no known side-effects even after prolonged use.


(ii) Flatulence

Triphala is prescribed to people who have excess acidity in their stomachs. A regular use of the Triphala helps to dissolve all the toxic acids in the stomach. This helps in the treatment of flatulence.

(iii) Gout

Due to its anti-inflammatory properties, Triphala is used in the treatment of gout and other joint problems. Gout is formed when excess uric acid deposits in the joints of the bones. This is removed by Triphala, which gets it expelled through urination. Therefore, the conditions of gout are brought to a minimum.

(iv) Liver Disorders

Triphala helps in the proper functioning of the liver and the pancreas. It regulates the bile duct and treats sluggishness of the liver. Triphala is a support to the liver in performing most of its physiological functions. It is a common medicine prescribed to patients of hepatitis.

(v) Nervous Disorders

Triphala is prescribed in nervous problems like the Alzheimer’s due to its cooling and toning properties. It can repair the degenerated nerves and bring the nervous system back to a normal state of functioning.

(vi) Obesity

Amalaki is especially known to disintegrate the fatty accumulation in the body. Thus, Triphala can reduce the excess weight in obese people. In addition, regular use of the Triphala can also heal several of the complications of obesity. Since Triphala can dissolve the serum cholesterol, it decreases the chances of cardiovascular problems. The acrid and bitter components of Triphala are also good in the treatment and control of diabetes mellitus, to which obese people are much prone.

(vii) Ocular Problems

Triphala has beneficial effects in the treatment of eye infections like conjunctivitis and visual problems like cataract and glaucoma. On a lighter note, Triphala is prescribed to treat eye problems such as fatigue, redness and soreness of the eyes. It is used as eyewash in these cases.

Precautions

Triphala does not have any major side-effects. But it must be avoided by pregnant woman. People having complaints of diarrhea and dysentery must also restrict the use of Triphala.
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