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Mold Illness Information & Products

Understanding and Determining the Etiology of Autism

 

 

 

Cell Mol Neurobiol. 2009 Sep 23. [Epub ahead of print]

 

Understanding and Determining the Etiology of Autism.

 

Currenti SA. Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE), State University of New York (SUNY), Albany, NY, USA, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

 

 

Worldwide, the rate of autism has been steadily rising. There are several environmental factors in concert with genetic susceptibilities that are contributing to this rise. Impaired methylation and mutations of mecp2 have been associated with autistic spectrum disorders, and related Rett syndrome. Genetic polymorphisms of cytochrome P450 enzymes have also been linked to autism, specifically CYP27B1 that is essential for proper vitamin D metabolism. Vitamin D is important for neuronal growth and neurodevelopment, and defects in metabolism or deficiency have been implicated in autistic individuals. Other factors that have been considered include: maternally derived antibodies, maternal infection, heavy metal exposure, folic acid supplementation, epigenetics, measles, mumps, rubella vaccination, and even electromagnetic radiation. In each case, the consequences, whether direct or indirect, negatively affect the nervous system, neurodevelopment, and environmental responsive genes. The etiology of autism is a topic of controversial debate, while researchers strive to achieve a common objective. The goal is to identify the cause(s) of autism to understand the complex interplay between environment and gene regulation. There is optimism that specific causes and risk factors will be identified. The results of future investigations will facilitate enhanced screening, prevention, and therapy for "at risk" and autistic patients.

 

PMID: 19774457 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

 


 

 

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