Social Links

Follow on Facebook Follow on Twitter Follow on G+Follow EiR on PinterestFollow EiR on Instagram

Xpert Access

×

Login To Get Involved!


Forgot your username?


Forgot your password?

DNRS Roof Banner

 

DNRS Interactive DVD Series & Seminars

Memory and attention problems in children with CFS ME

 

 

 

Arch Dis Child. 2008 Nov 11. [Epub ahead of print]

 

Memory and attention problems in children with CFS/ME.

 

Haig-Ferguson A, Tucker P, Eaton N, Hunt L, Crawley E. University of Bristol, United Kingdom.

 

 

OBJECTIVE: To understand more about the problems children with CFS/ME experience with their memory and attention, and to test the feasibility of quantitative measurement of both memory and attention.

 

DESIGN: 4 item semi-structured questionnaire and Neuropsychological test battery with 10 psychometric subtests.

 

SETTING: Family home of the child taking part. Patients: 20 children with a diagnosis of CFS/ME and experiencing memory and/or concentration problems were recruited between April and October 2007 from a regional CFS/ME clinical service (Female=13; Average age 13.5yrs; Range 8 - 16 yrs).

 

METHODS: Each child, parent and teacher was asked to describe the child's memory and attention problems. Responses were subject to thematic analysis by two independent researchers. In addition each child completed a battery of 10 tests to measure: Processing speed; Attention; Immediate and Delayed Memory; Working Memory; Executive Function. Raw scores were converted into age-scaled scores and the children's psychometric scores on the 10 tests taken were compared with normative data using t-tests.

 

RESULTS: Children with CFS/ME, their parents and teachers described problems with focussed attention, sustained attention, recall and stress. Children's scores were compared to normative data. Scores for sustained attention (mean 8.1, 95% CI 6.3-9.9), switching attention (7.5, 5.5-9.4), divided attention (6.9, 5.5-8.2), auditory learning (8.2, 6.8-9.6) and immediate recall (8.7, 7.3-10.0) appeared lower than the normative mean of 10.

 

CONCLUSIONS: Children with CFS/ME appear to experience problems with attention, which may have adverse implications for verbal memory. These cognitive problems may explain some of the educational difficulties associated with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

 

PMID: 19001478 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

 


 

 

Related Articles:

 

  • No comments found

Leave your comments

Post comment as a guest

0 Character restriction
Your text should be more than 25 characters
Your comments are subjected to administrator's moderation.
terms and condition.

Adsense Responsive BottomBanner