Social Links

Follow on Facebook Follow on Twitter Follow on G+Follow EiR on PinterestFollow EiR on Instagram

Xpert Access

×

Login To Get Involved!


Forgot your username?


Forgot your password?

DNRS Roof Banner

 

DNRS Interactive DVD Series & Seminars

Citalopram is not Effective Therapy for Non Depressed Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

 

 

 

 

Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2009 Sep 16. [Epub ahead of print]

 

Citalopram is not Effective Therapy for Non-Depressed Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

 

Ladabaum U, Sharabidze A, Levin TR, Zhao WK, Chung E, Bacchetti P, Jin C, Grimes B, Pepin CJ. Division of Gastroenterology, University of California, San Francisco, CA; Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA.

 

 

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Data are conflicting on the benefit of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); the role of visceral sensitivity in IBS pathophysiology is unclear. We assessed the effects of citalopram and the relationships between, symptoms, and quality of life (QOL), and rectal sensitivity in non-depressed patients with IBS.

 

METHODS: Patients from primary, secondary and tertiary care centers were randomly assigned to groups given citalopram (20 mg/day for 4 weeks, then 40 mg/day for 4 weeks) or placebo. The study was double masked with concealed allocation. Symptoms were assessed weekly; IBS-QOL and rectal sensation were determined from barostat measurements made at the beginning and end of the study.

 

RESULTS: Patients that received citalopram did not have a higher rate of adequate relief from IBS symptoms than subjects that received placebo (12/27, 44% vs 15/27, 56% respectively; P=0.59), regardless of IBS subtype. The odds ratio for weekly response to citalopram vs placebo was 0.80 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.61-1.04). Citalopram did not reduce specific symptoms or increase IBS-QOL scores; it had no effect on rectal compliance and a minimal effect on sensation. Changes in IBS-QOL score and pressure-eliciting pain were correlated (r=0.33, 95% CI 0.03-0.57); changes in symptoms and rectal sensitivity or IBS-QOL scores were not correlated.

 

CONCLUSIONS: Citalopram was not superior to placebo in treating non-depressed IBS patients. Changes in symptoms were not correlated with changes in rectal sensation assessed by barostat; Any benefit of citalopram in non-depressed IBS patients is likely to be modest.

 

PMID: 19765674 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

 

 

 

{mosgoogle}

 

{mos_sb_discuss:11}

 


 

 

Related Articles:

 

  • No comments found

Leave your comments

Post comment as a guest

0 Character restriction
Your text should be more than 25 characters
Your comments are subjected to administrator's moderation.
terms and condition.

Adsense Responsive BottomBanner