FMT Clinical Study Results - New England Journal of Medicine

Discussion started by Doorie 5 years ago

The results of a clinical study in the Netherlands was published in the January issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Link:

http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1205037 

 

The same issue also has an editorial piece on FMT ("Fecal Microbiota Transplantation - An Old Therapy Comes of Age")

Link:

http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMe1214816 

 

 

 

 

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Maff
Maff
Doorie,

I believe my gut issues also arose (or were at least significantly worsened) by repeated prescribing of broad spectrum antibiotics for superficial infections of the ENT variety. I obtained my full medical records a few years back and learned that I had been given 6 courses in the 8 months leading up to my development of M.E./Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. I had pre-existing and frequent gut symptoms and these only worsened after developing ME/CFS. I believe antibiotics are partially responsible for both. I have spoken to many enlightened doctors and gastroenterologists since who have all baulked at the thought of a child being given so many courses of antibiotics as the immune system is still developing.

Thanks for the extra information about the Dutch study. It's a shame in a way that it was cut short as 120 participants is usually enough to achieve statistically significant results. It looks like a quality study so the researchers no doubt used a 'Power Calculation' during the study design to make sure this was the case.

On the other hand the reason for the study being cut short is very positive indeed in terms of the efficacy of the FMT treatment!

It will be interesting to see the results that come out of the Canadian study. Their use of participants own fecal matter for FMT as a placebo in the control group is an excellent methodology. Let's wait and see!
5 years ago
Doorie
Doorie
Maff,
You are very welcome. Since my issues arose after 3 years on broad spectrum antibiotics, I am convinced that FMT has a great deal to offer, hence my interest in the subject matter. It makes intuitive sense.

The Dutch study had to cut it short, resulting in a smaller sample size. The original study had planned for 120 people (also a small sample, but better than 43).

In the Dutch study, the people in the study who did not receive FMT all relapsed, while those who received FMT had remarkable cure/remission rates, so it was decided that it was not ethical to continue the study, and it was cut short. I think the people who did not receive FMT as part of the study received it upon the decision to discontinue the study.

I did not read the details with respect to what the non-FMT group received in the Dutch study. The study currently underway in Hamilton, Canada, has the controls receiving FMT of their own fecal matter.

Cheers,
5 years ago
Maff
Maff
Hi Doorie,

Thank you for your continued posts on FMT. I think you and our other resident expert on the subject (Bushi) are showing just how much information there is out there now. We've got studies and articles in everything from formal medical journals to popular science magazines...and even a recent edition of The Economist!

The Dutch study provides another very positive result regarding treatment of C. difficile infection with FMT. I just wish they had used a larger sample. It's not really possible to draw firm conclusions with sample sizes that small. Still, it adds to all the other positive results.

NEJM editorial is just further evidence of the awareness of FMT that has quickly developed these past years. As we get data from the Human Microbiome Project (HMP) published I am sure advances and awareness in this area will only accelerate. I am very hopeful for a resolution to my own intractable gut dysbiosis problems in coming years.
5 years ago

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