Support for Stress/Exercise Crashes

Discussion started by TheStache 8 years ago

For the past 6 months, I have made great progress with my adrenal issues: my circadian cycle has stabalized, I have more energy when awake in the morning, and I no longer need to spend the majority of the day supine for lack of energy.  This is mostly in part to support from doctors, my own research, and of course, this site!  I am always happy to share my experience, and have done my best to document what has worked for me within the site.

 

...that being said, I continue to have challenges with energy "crashes" and wild fluctuations when exposed to stress of all forms.  This includes external (traffic, being in crowded places), internal (getting angry or emotional about something), and most importantly, minor exercise.  Pacing has been very important to my recovery, and I am continuing to work on staying within my own energy "envelope."  However, I firmly believe that knowing when you are ready for the next step of your recovery is equally important.  If I had stopped attempting new treatments and supplements every time I was told to "just stick with it" I would be nowhere near as recovered as I am.  

 

So here I am, ready for the next step.  The problem is I feel I may have exhausted my options.  Treatments such as hydrocortisone, licorice, Rhodiola, and other adaptogens were very helpful in the past for helping with low energy/low cortisol, but they do not seem to have an impact for me on stress and exercise tolerance.  B Vitamins and Vitamin C seem to be continually referenced as helpful, but I have not seen them assist in this area as well.  Phosphatidylserine was a HUGE step, especially at a time when even having a conversation with another person was a stressful event.  It too, however, does not seem to have an impact here.

 

Does anyone have any others suggestions of what they have seen work?  

Or maybe have a sense that these remaining symptoms are no longer adrenal issues, but issues with thyroid, mitochondrial energy, etc.?

 

You need to be a member of this group before you can participate in this discussion.
Maff
Maff
Very unusual to to get feelings of anger and aggression from ~3mg of DHEA would have thought. At that dose there would be virtually no effect on your androgen levels. In fact a lot of literature suggests that the conversion of too much DHEA into androgens such as testosterone is far more of a problem for women than men.

Goes to show that we're all different as I felt the effects from DHEA seemed very natural and it provided energy and stress resistence in a way I could cope with, in contrast to the other things I have tried for adrenal fatigue that have always been too stimulating.

7-keto is definitely worth a try if you feel DHEA was having side-effects or not helping as you'd like. I gave it a go but found it didn't have the positive effects that DHEA did. Like I said we're all different!

Glad the D-ribose seems to be helping your energy levels
8 years ago
TheStache
TheStache
Doctor just informed me about an alternative to DHEA, 7-Keto DHEA, a supplement that has all of the immune/thyroid benefits of DHEA but does not get converted into steroid hormones. Going to give this one a shot and see if the side effects I noticed from DHEA exist with 7-Keto.
8 years ago
TheStache
TheStache
I have experimented with DHEA, but in the doses I was taking (1/8 of a 25mg sublingual tab) it seemed to produce a very...chemical feeling. It did provide energy, but it seemed somewhat superficial (vs. a more natural feeling from D-Ribose and Rhodiola) and tended to make me somewhat hormonal with feelings of anger and aggression.

Always willing to try again, as that was a few months ago; I welcome any brand recommendations, as it could just be the quality of the supplement I was taking that had the negative effects.

CoQ10 - Took this initially, and if it had results, I would say they were very minor
D-Ribose - Started a few weeks ago, and definitely see an improvement in overall energy as well as maintaining energy throughout the day. Stress/exercise tolerance seems unchanged.
acetyl-l-carnitine - just ordered earlier in the week, and will see what results happen on that.
NADH - That is a new one for me, I will take a look, thanks.

What about adrenal glandulars? I noticed both were mentioned on the videos posted to this group.

8 years ago
Maff
Maff
Hey,

Thanks so much for continuing to share your experiences and progress with various treatments. I certainly appreciate it and know many visitors to the site will also.

You didn't mention DHEA and I don't remember if you'd had your levels tested or tried it in the past. For me this was hugely beneficial in terms of improving stress tolerence and providing even energy levels without crashes. I believe the latter was a result of the DHEA improving blood sugar regulation as I ceased to experience typical hypoglycaemic symptoms that I had long suffered with. Unfortunately in my case I had to stop taking the DHEA as my liver was already very overburdened and it couldn't handle the extra work. DHEA has very different but complementary effects to hydrocortisone/licorice in my experience so well worth a trial if you haven't already.

Vitamins B and C should in theory be helpful - the highest concentrations of vitamin C in the body are found in the adrenal glands and it is required for adrenal hormone release I believe. In practice however they do nothing for me in this area and I don't see many people raving about them.

Thyroid and mitochondrial ATP production could certainly be other factors contributing to our illnesses. Thyroid hormones tend to be very stimulating however and tend to worsen things rather than improve them if stress intolerence is a big issue. Always a good idea to have a full thyroid panel done by your doctor to see what's going on there. Have you tried any supplements aimed at improving energy production such as CoQ10, NADH, d-ribose, acetyl-l-carnitine?

8 years ago

Related Discussions