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TOPIC: Hope for Fatigue

Hope for Fatigue 1 year 9 months ago #1

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A new website that offers hope for those suffering from fatigue!
The Unifying Theory of Mitochondrial Dysfunction

There is a steadily growing body of evidence linking many adult-onset diseases, including fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Alzheimer’s disease, autoimmune diseases, and even diabetes, to a single common cause, referred to as "Mitochondrial Dysfunction".

Mitochondria are the “energy powerhouses” of the cell. They burn the food we consume and generate all the energy our cells need to function.

It is a proven fact that as we age the mitochondria's ability to produce an adequate amount of healthy energy begins to decline. Factors such as stress, poor nutrition, and exposure to toxic chemicals in the environment have all been shown to accelerate this process. As mitochondrial energy production progressively declines, the genetic makeup of a given individual determines which organ system will break down first. In other words, a person’s "genetic weak link" determines which disease they will ultimately develop. However, it’s the progressive loss of mitochondrial health over time that fuels this process.

To learn more, visit: hopeforfatigue.org
Last Edit: 1 year 9 months ago by Maff. Reason: Removed duplicate link
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Hope for Fatigue 1 year 9 months ago #2

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Thank you Danya for taking the time to submit this post, it's informative while not being too technical for the average reader. As site admin and long-term Chronic Fatigue Syndrome patient I am sure the mitochondrial dysfunction connection between so many common chronic diseases will be a revelation to many of our site visitors.

I feel your work and website are so important that I'd like to propose a collaboration of some sort so as to better reach the intended audience with the information you provide. With your permission I'd like to syndicate some of your website's content which I could then share across all of The Environmental Illness Resource's social media accounts and mailing list - a potential audience of ten thousand individuals. Alternatively, I could personally author a series of articles focusing on individual aspects of your work (or specific diseases) and link back to your site for further information. Either way, I am motivated to help you reach more of those people who would benefit.

It would be great to discuss further via email if you are at all interested (Main Menu: About -> Contact Us) . Regards, Matthew
If you are going through hell, keep going - Winston Churchill
Last Edit: 1 year 9 months ago by Maff.
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Hope for Fatigue 1 year 8 months ago #3

There is some interesting information on the site. I did want to call attention to the sponsor of the site, K-Pax Pharmaceuticals. They promote the use of low dose (I believe) Ritalin for CFS. I've heard of them before, and their medication ideas don't really resonate with me. Just wanted to let people know, since it isn't very prominent on the site. The information on a mitochondrial basis behind many chronic illnesses is valuable and many people may benefit from learning about that.
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Hope for Fatigue 1 year 8 months ago #4

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Thank you for bringing the K-Pax Pharmaceuticals connection to our attention Denise. Always wise to take into account any potential conflicts of interest and other factors when evaluating health information - and that goes for my little site here also!

However, I've been talking to the researchers at Hope for Fatigue and feel they have a genuine passion for the mitochondrial link to chronic illnesses above anything else. They have kindly provided further information via email on this important subject and their research into it which I will publish here at The Environmental Illness Resource shortly.

Re: the use of low dose Ritalin for chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) - I would not be too hasty to dismiss the idea. Clearly the drug company is looking for new markets for this medication but there is a logical hypothesis that is worth exploring here. Many of the symptoms of ME/CFS can be attributed to a central deficiency of catecholamine neurotransmitter activity (e.g. dopamine, noradrenaline / norepinephrine) which results in the brain being unable to filter out sensory "noise" (e.g. bright lights, other people's conversations etc) and focus on what we patients actually wish to focus on. Obviously, this results in all of the symptoms we commonly refer to as 'brain fog' and explains why ME/CFS patients become physically exhausted so quickly in "busy" environments. Using Ritalin in low doses could raise catecholamine activity just enough to restore normal sensory input filtering, thus improving focus and concentration and reducing fatigue - thus avoiding rapid exhaustion. Dr.Jay A. Goldstein MD explored this concept 20 years ago with a good deal of clinical success according to anecdotal patient reports, I highly recommend his books 'Betrayal By The Brain' and 'Tuning The Brain'.

I once believed the only way to recover from ME/CFS was by using naturopathic medicine (going so far as to obtain a bachelor's degree in nutritional medicine) but time and experience has taught me that we need to consider all theories and ideas regarding the nature of this hugely complex illness and use all the tools at our disposal in order to progress on the road to recovery. All the best on your own journey Denise and thank you again for the heads up!
If you are going through hell, keep going - Winston Churchill
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