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Gut Reaction Maff Hot

https://www.ei-resource.org/media/reviews/photos/thumbnail/250x250s/ce/28/1e/2940_gutreaction_124811264823.jpg
Written by Maff     July 20, 2009    
 
6.8
3644   0   0   0   0

A bestselling programme that kick-starts your digestion and detoxes your body system.

Most of us accept that diet has a profound effect on our overall health and well-being. Gudrun Jonsson believes that the best diet in the world counts for nothing if you don't digest your food properly.

Gut Reaction explains how malabsorbed foods build up in the digestive system as toxins, undermining our vitality, our immunity to disease and ultimately our health. Gut Reaction shows how you can reduce this toxicity by following a unique regime combining sound nutritional advice, homeopathy and reflexology. The results are startling and include:

 

  • steady weight-loss
  • increased levels of energy
  • a boosted immune system
  • a reduction of most allergy-induced illness
  • a clarity of mind

 

Direct, simple, empowering and proven for people of all ages, follow Gut Reaction to achieve health, energy and happiness.

Gudrun Jonsson trained as a Biopath at the Biopath Clinic and Educational Centre in Copenhagen before establishing her practice in London.


Gut Reaction


» Buy from Amazon.co.uk

 

 

Editor reviews

I bought this book to review for the site after having read a glowing recommendation on a blog which had some good content.

I have to say overall I am very disappointed with Gut Reaction. The emphasis on getting back to basics by urging readers to chew food properly and eat in a relaxed environment, amongst other things, is commendable. As is the fact the author prefers not to rely on nutritional supplements.

However, everything is covered very quickly and in very little detail. The role of digestion and diet in health is given a brief summary before tips such as those for improving eating habits are described. The author then provides tailored dietary plans for a host of illnesses with little discussion of rationale before skimming over nutrients, nutritional supplements and a few other topics at the end of the book.

The credibility of some of the recommendations is also questionable, particularly with regard to pH balancing. It is said that drinking lemon and olive oil "counteract[s] acidity in the stomach, making the system more alkaline, and clears undigested food particles." For starters lemon juice itself is acidic and only has an alkalizing effect on the body once it is absorbed and metabolised. Secondly, I'm unsure why anyone would want to counteract acidity in the stomach - it is acidic for a reason which is because it needs to be to properly digest protein. Partially digested proteins increase the risk of food allergy and intolerance, as well as small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO).

This aside, the bulk of the tips for healthy eating habits are useful and the lay reader new to the subject of nutrition may find this book a good read. For those looking for something a little more in depth and scientifically sound I would recommend Digestive Wellness by Lipski or Optimum Digestion by Nichols and Faass (eds).

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Maff Reviewed by Maff July 20, 2009
#1 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (107)

Some good advice but very simplistic

I bought this book to review for the site after having read a glowing recommendation on a blog which had some good content.

I have to say overall I am very disappointed with Gut Reaction. The emphasis on getting back to basics by urging readers to chew food properly and eat in a relaxed environment, amongst other things, is commendable. As is the fact the author prefers not to rely on nutritional supplements.

However, everything is covered very quickly and in very little detail. The role of digestion and diet in health is given a brief summary before tips such as those for improving eating habits are described. The author then provides tailored dietary plans for a host of illnesses with little discussion of rationale before skimming over nutrients, nutritional supplements and a few other topics at the end of the book.

The credibility of some of the recommendations is also questionable, particularly with regard to pH balancing. It is said that drinking lemon and olive oil "counteract[s] acidity in the stomach, making the system more alkaline, and clears undigested food particles." For starters lemon juice itself is acidic and only has an alkalizing effect on the body once it is absorbed and metabolised. Secondly, I'm unsure why anyone would want to counteract acidity in the stomach - it is acidic for a reason which is because it needs to be to properly digest protein. Partially digested proteins increase the risk of food allergy and intolerance, as well as small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO).

This aside, the bulk of the tips for healthy eating habits are useful and the lay reader new to the subject of nutrition may find this book a good read. For those looking for something a little more in depth and scientifically sound I would recommend Digestive Wellness by Lipski or Optimum Digestion by Nichols and Faass (eds).

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