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Effects of specific lactic acid bacteria on intestinal permeability

 

 

 

Acta Paediatr Suppl. 2005 Oct;94(449):34-6.

 

Effects of specific lactic acid bacteria on the intestinal permeability to macromolecules and the inflammatory condition.

 

Heyman M, Terpend K, Menard S.

 

INSERM EMI 0212, Faculte Necker-Enfants malades, Paris, France.

 

Non-live probiotic bacteria and their fermentation products can be used in milk-based formula intended for healthy infants. The effects of a milk formula fermented with Bifidobacterium breve and Streptococcus thermophilus and heated/dehydrated to inactivate the micro-organisms have been reported over the last few years to decrease the intestinal permeability to macromolecules in experimental animals in vivo and more recently to down-regulate inflammatory condition in vitro. Feeding guinea-pigs with such dehydrated fermented milk reinforced the intestinal barrier resistance to food proteins (HRP, beta-lactoglobulin). In addition, the products secreted by bacteria were capable of inhibiting the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced TNF-alpha secretion by human peripheral mononuclear blood cells. The active secretion products were resistant to digestive enzymes and their anti-inflammatory properties were preserved after transepithelial transport across the filter-grown intestinal epithelial cell line, especially in inflammatory conditions. The binding of LPS to monocytes as well as NFkappaB nuclear translocation leading to pro-inflammatory cytokine transcription were inhibited by bacteria-culture supernatants. CONCLUSION: B. breve and S. thermophilus used as non-live micro-organisms in fermented infant formula seem to induce a reduction in macromolecular absorption and release metabolites exerting an anti-TNF-alpha effect, which persists after intestinal transport. Thus, specific lactic acid bacteria and their metabolites seem to affect positively the intestinal function.

 

PMID: 16214764 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 


 

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