Social Links

Follow on Facebook Follow on TwitterFollow EiR on PinterestFollow EiR on Instagram

Xpert Access

×

Login To Get Involved!


Forgot your username?


Forgot your password?

×

Join Us At EiR Now!

DNRS Roof Banner

 

Universal AJAX Live Search

Search - Categories
Search - Contacts
Search - Content
Search - Newsfeeds
Search - Weblinks

Mucosal Damage and Neutropenia Are Required for Candida albicans Dissemination

 

 

 

PLoS Pathog. 2008 Feb 15;4(2):e35 [Epub ahead of print]

 

Mucosal Damage and Neutropenia Are Required for Candida albicans Dissemination.

 

Koh AY, Köhler JR, Coggshall KT, Van Rooijen N, Pier GB.

 

 

Candida albicans fungemia in cancer patients is thought to develop from initial gastrointestinal (GI) colonization with subsequent translocation into the bloodstream after administration of chemotherapy. It is unclear what components of the innate immune system are necessary for preventing C. albicans dissemination from the GI tract, but we have hypothesized that both neutropenia and GI mucosal damage are critical for allowing widespread invasive C. albicans disease. We investigated these parameters in a mouse model of C. albicans GI colonization that led to systemic spread after administration of immunosuppression and mucosal damage. After depleting resident GI intestinal flora with antibiotic treatment and achieving stable GI colonization levels of C. albicans, it was determined that systemic chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide led to 100% mortality, whereas selective neutrophil depletion, macrophage depletion, lymphopenia or GI mucosal disruption alone resulted in no mortality. Selective neutrophil depletion combined with GI mucosal disruption led to disseminated fungal infection and 100% mortality ensued. GI translocation and dissemination by C. albicans was also dependent on the organism's ability to transform from the yeast to the hyphal form. This mouse model of GI colonization and fungemia is useful for studying factors of innate host immunity needed to prevent invasive C. albicans disease as well as identifying virulence factors that are necessary for fungal GI colonization and dissemination. The model may also prove valuable for evaluating therapies to control C. albicans infections.

 

PMID: 18282097 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

 


 

Please Review The Environmental Illness Resource on Google or FacebookPlease Help Support EiR with a Positive Google or Facebook Page Review!

If you like EiR and / or enoyed this content; please help us keep going by leaving a Positive Google Review:

https://g.page/r/CbAgn_56aqWaEAI/review 

OR:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ei.resource

P.S. This is entirely secure, we collect no data other than what is freely available from Google and you can remain anonymous!

 


Related Articles:

 

Mold Testing & Sanitizer:

 

 

 

 

ADVERTISEMENT

 

  • No comments found

Leave your comments

Post comment as a guest

0 Character restriction
Your text should be more than 25 characters
Your comments are subjected to administrator's moderation.
terms and condition.

Adsense Responsive BottomBanner