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Low T3 syndrome in psychiatric depression

 

 

 

 

J Endocrinol Invest. 2006 Jun;29(6):568-72.

 

Low T3 syndrome in psychiatric depression.

 

Premachandra BN, Kabir MA, Williams IK.

 

Thyroid Specialty Laboratory, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

 

In euthyroid sick syndrome [non-thyroidal illness (NTI)], a number of investigators have described TSH and serum thyroid hormone abnormalities, low T3, low T3 and T4, increased T4, low TSH, etc. Those cases of NTI where there is only T3 decrease [and normal serum T4, free T4 (FT4), and TSH levels] are specifically referred to as low T3 syndrome. However, the information in regard to low T3 syndrome in psychiatric subjects who are clinically euthyroid and do not have any other systemic illness is scanty. In our facility, since thyroid function is routinely assessed in psychiatric patients at admission, this provided the opportunity to study low T3 syndrome in a large group of psychiatric patients. Out of 250 subjects with major psychiatric depression, 6.4% exhibited low T3 syndrome (mean serum T3 concentration 0.94 nmol/l vs normal mean serum concentration of 1.77 nmol/l). The low T3 levels could not be ascribed to malnutrition or any other illness and the metabolic parameters were all normal. Possible mechanisms contributing to low T3 are discussed. The depression might constitute an illness having the same relation to low T3 as found in the low T3 syndrome previously described in euthyroid sick subjects. The present findings, besides describing low T3 syndrome in psychiatric patients without systemic illnesses, suggest the possibility of subgrouping in clinical psychiatric depression which may have a broader clinical significance.

 

PMID: 16840838 [PubMed - in process]

 

 

 

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