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Prevalence of self-reported symptoms and consequences related to inhalation of airborne chemicals

 

 

 

 

Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2008 Jul;81(7):881-7. Epub 2007 Dec 6.

 

Prevalence of self-reported symptoms and consequences related to inhalation of airborne chemicals in a Danish general population.

 

Berg ND, Linneberg A, Dirksen A, Elberling J. The Danish Research Centre for Chemical Sensitivities, Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Ledreborg Allé 40, 2.th, 2820 Gentofte, Denmark. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence and consequences of self-reported symptoms related to inhalation of airborne chemicals in a Danish general population.

 

METHODS: A random sample of 18-69-year-old individuals (n = 6,000) was drawn from the Danish Civil Registration System. A questionnaire on self-reported symptoms related to inhalation of 11 categories of airborne chemicals was mailed to the population. Respondents who reported symptoms received an additional questionnaire to verify the reported symptoms and to characterise factors related to the initial onset of symptoms.

 

RESULTS: The response rate to the primary questionnaire was 71%. A total of 1,134 individuals (27%, 95% CI 25-28) reported symptoms related to inhalation of airborne chemicals, 141 individuals (3.3%, 95% CI 2.8-3.9) reported adjustments of social life or occupational conditions due to symptoms, whereas 20 individuals (0.5%, 95% CI 0.3-0.7) had made adjustments of both social life and occupational conditions. Women reported more exposures as annoying than men and had more symptoms related to inhalation of airborne chemicals (P < 0.001). However, sex had no effect on the reporting of adjustments of social life or occupational conditions (P = 0.54).

 

CONCLUSION: Symptoms related to inhalation of airborne chemicals were common in this general population, and a minority reported that these symptoms affected social life or occupational conditions. Women as compared to men reported more symptoms but not adjustments of social life or occupational conditions.

 

PMID: 18058120 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

 

 

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