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Phosphatidylserine (PS) Maff Hot

https://www.ei-resource.org/media/reviews/photos/thumbnail/250x250s/59/a4/d9/2945_ps_124827628469.jpg
Written by Maff     July 22, 2009    
 
8.8
4073   0   0   0   0

Phosphatidylserine (PS) is a phospholipid and a major component of cell membranes within the body. Phospholipids are fatty substances made up predominantly of fatty acids, amino acids, and the mineral phosphorous/phosphate. Phosphatidylserine is found in particularly high concentrations in the membranes of cells with high metabolic activity including those of the brain, heart, liver, and skeletal muscle.

PS therefore helps to maintain the health of cell membranes which is essential for the functioning of important chemical such as hormones, neurotransmitters, and immune signalling molecules such as cytokines. There are receptors for all of these chemicals on cell membranes; if the cell membrane is not healthy the receptors will not be either and these chemicals may not do their jobs correctly.

Dietary sources of PS are mainly limited to animal sources. Meat, organ meats, fish, and seafood having the highest concentrations. A number of beans such as soy beans also contain significant amounts but it is scare in other plant foods.

Phosphatidylserine as a supplement is best known as a a brain function enhancer. Studies using PS derived from the brains of cows found it improves cognitive function, particularly age-related memory impairment and the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. PS may also improve other aspects of cognitive function such as concentration and mental focus. The PS available in supplement form is extracted from soy and it is uncertain whether this is as effective as that derived from cows when taken orally by humans. One study in rats however found they had comparable effects.

Another interesting effect of phosphatidylcholine is its ability to suppress production of the stress hormone cortisol. Elevated cortisol is found in depression, anxiety and other mood and stress disorders. Cortisol production can also be dysfunctional in adrenal fatigue and illnesses including chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia.

Finally PS supplementation has been found to significantly increase the length of time taken to reach exhaustion during exercise; this possibly being due to the role that it plays in ATP (energy) production.

 

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References:
Kingsley MI Wadsworth D Kiduff LP McEneny J Benton D (2005) Effects of phosphatidylserine on oxidative stress following intermittent running Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise 37(8):1300-6
Sahelian R (2000) Mind Boosters St. Martin's Griffin
Hellhammer J Fries E Buss C Engert V Tuch A Rutenberg D Hellhammer D (2004) Effects of Soy Lecithin Phosphatidic Acid and Phosphatidylserine Complex (PAS) on the Endocrine and Psychological Responses to Mental Stress Stress: The International Journal on the Biology of Stress 7(2):119–26

 

Editor reviews

I recently came across a substantial amount of research suggesting PS could lower production of cortisol produced after exercise or due to mental stress.

I suffer from chronic fatigue syndrome and my body clock is all over the place. I feel wired at night and am unable to get myself to bed at a reasonable hour and my sleep quality is poor. Adrenal stress index (ASI) test have suggested this may be because I am producing large amounts of cortisol at night when production should actually be its lowest.

I have been taking 300mg of phosphatidylserine every day around 8pm for a month now and found it to be a great help from day one. Within an hour I felt myself winding down and the need for sleep approaching. Basically I felt how I should at that time of day - something I haven't felt in a long long time. I feel my sleep quality has also improved as I am waking feeling more refreshed.

I've not noticed any other benefits from taking PS such as cognitive improvements or improved exercise capacity.

PS is not a miracle cure by any means but it has definitely helped improve my sleep problems which I know will affect many others with ME/CFS, fibromyalgia, depression, and many other illnesses.

Overall rating 
 
8.8
Perceived Effectiveness  
 
8.0
Lack of side effects (tolerability)  
 
10.0
Ease of use  
 
10.0
Value for money  
 
7.0
Would you recommend? 
 
9.0
Maff Reviewed by Maff July 22, 2009
Last updated: July 22, 2009
#1 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (107)

Very useful for lowering cortisol and aiding restf

I recently came across a substantial amount of research suggesting PS could lower production of cortisol produced after exercise or due to mental stress.

I suffer from chronic fatigue syndrome and my body clock is all over the place. I feel wired at night and am unable to get myself to bed at a reasonable hour and my sleep quality is poor. Adrenal stress index (ASI) test have suggested this may be because I am producing large amounts of cortisol at night when production should actually be its lowest.

I have been taking 300mg of phosphatidylserine every day around 8pm for a month now and found it to be a great help from day one. Within an hour I felt myself winding down and the need for sleep approaching. Basically I felt how I should at that time of day - something I haven't felt in a long long time. I feel my sleep quality has also improved as I am waking feeling more refreshed.

I've not noticed any other benefits from taking PS such as cognitive improvements or improved exercise capacity.

PS is not a miracle cure by any means but it has definitely helped improve my sleep problems which I know will affect many others with ME/CFS, fibromyalgia, depression, and many other illnesses.

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