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Reflexology Maff Hot

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Written by Maff     October 30, 2007    
 
8.0
8188   0   0   0   0

Reflexology has its origins in the ancient healing arts of Egypt, China, and India. It was introduced to the West in the late 19th and early 20th century as 'Zone Therapy', only later becoming known as reflexology.

Reflexologists believe that the soles of the feet are split into different zones that are linked to specific organs and tissues in the body. The aim of reflexology is to massage the areas of the feet corresponding to areas of the body with known dysfunction, or which the practitioner detects through feeling tension in the feet. It is suggested that the messaging stimulates the target area of the body improving function, reducing pain etc. The technique is also used as a method of stress reduction and relaxation.

Reflexology is based on the energy system that underpins Asian/Oriental medicine techniques such as acupuncture. It is said that an energy field is associated with the body and that when there is a disruption in the flow of this energy, often referred to as 'Qi', the body develops disease. The practice of reflexology, like acupuncture, is a means of correcting energy imbalances and restoring health.

In the West a number of different mechanisms for how reflexology works have been proposed. These include the stimulation of endorphin production, stimulation of specific nerve circuits, and the enhancement of lymphatic flow. Research testing these specific theories is spares but reflexology has been shown to be effective in various conditions in clinical trials. When used in patients with heart disease for instance it was shown to decrease blood pressure. Other research has shown it to be useful in reducing stress and symptoms of depression.

Reflexology is becoming increasingly popular with a number of professional organizations now operating and a growing number of practitioners offering treatments. A reflexology session generally lasts 30-60 minutes.

 

 

 

Editor reviews

I am lucky in that my mum is a reflexologist so I have had easy access to treatment over the years. I have to admit I was initially very sceptical and didn't expect any benefit.

I soon changed my mind however, after only a single hour long treatment. The sense of relaxation I experienced was really profound. As a result of suffering from CFS I have problems with stress, depression and sleep. During reflexology treatment all of these are improved. My body and mind both feel more relaxed and free from stress than they do at any other time. To be honest it is really a struggle to stay awake during a reflexology session! My mum tells me that this is common with all of her clients.

In support of the theory that reflexologists can locate problem areas in the body by feeling tension and sore areas in the feet, I have to say that certain areas of my feet do feel very sore when pressure is applied. I have not injured my feet in these areas and do not notice pain or soreness there at any other time so perhaps there is something in it.

After having a reflexology treatment I find I can sleep more soundly for a few days. Unfortunately I have had no long-term benefits from the treatments. I haven't had any sustained increase in energy or improvement in mood. However, during the treatment and for a few days after the benefits are unmistakable.

I would certainly recommend reflexology to anyone suffering from stress, depression, insomnia, nervous exhaustion etc. If you can afford to visit a reflexologist every week then the benefits may well be maintained. It is worth a trial just to experience the deep level of relaxation that can be achieved.

Overall rating 
 
8.0
Perceived Effectiveness  
 
7.0
Lack of side effects (tolerability)  
 
10.0
Ease of use  
 
8.0
Value for money  
 
7.0
Would you recommend? 
 
8.0
Maff Reviewed by Maff October 30, 2007
Last updated: July 29, 2009
#1 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (107)

Great for stress relief and relaxation

I am lucky in that my mum is a reflexologist so I have had easy access to treatment over the years. I have to admit I was initially very sceptical and didn't expect any benefit.

I soon changed my mind however, after only a single hour long treatment. The sense of relaxation I experienced was really profound. As a result of suffering from CFS I have problems with stress, depression and sleep. During reflexology treatment all of these are improved. My body and mind both feel more relaxed and free from stress than they do at any other time. To be honest it is really a struggle to stay awake during a reflexology session! My mum tells me that this is common with all of her clients.

In support of the theory that reflexologists can locate problem areas in the body by feeling tension and sore areas in the feet, I have to say that certain areas of my feet do feel very sore when pressure is applied. I have not injured my feet in these areas and do not notice pain or soreness there at any other time so perhaps there is something in it.

After having a reflexology treatment I find I can sleep more soundly for a few days. Unfortunately I have had no long-term benefits from the treatments. I haven't had any sustained increase in energy or improvement in mood. However, during the treatment and for a few days after the benefits are unmistakable.

I would certainly recommend reflexology to anyone suffering from stress, depression, insomnia, nervous exhaustion etc. If you can afford to visit a reflexologist every week then the benefits may well be maintained. It is worth a trial just to experience the deep level of relaxation that can be achieved.

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